Warm & Cool

In recent design projects, we have been finding ways to warm up the cool palettes of the last few seasons. Traditionally, either warm or cool neutrals predominate a space. Cool grays, silver, and washed wood tones still find favor with many homeowners due to their modern and understated sensibilities.  Even so warm neutral tones are making a comeback from their several year hiatus.

 We remember looking through resources during this peak in cool tones and wondering if everything warmer than taupe had  become extinct. Embracing warm tones comes naturally to us as they add a wonderful comfort and richness to a space. We love encouraging a mix of neutrals as we have found that it creates a sophisticated and unexpected palette that our clients love.

Cool Warm Mood Shot

One of our favorite examples of a piece that bridges warm and cool wood tones harmoniously is our beautiful Tusk table.  Don’t underestimate the power of accessorizing to reenforce the striking balance of warm and cool as well. (above). From rugs and gimp tapes to wallpaper, we find that this trend is really taking off within the design community. We had fun arranging a group of our favorites below.

Warm & Cool Collage

Warm & Cool Collage

Here at MakeNest, we love a confident mix. Just like wood tones and accent peices, try mixing neutrals in other materials too! We are looking at you, gold and silver.

Design Checklist: Guest Rooms

As of this writing, I’ve determined to overhaul our guest room this fall.  It won’t be an easy project because the floor needs to be replaced as well as the bittersweet work of painting.  However, it is exciting to me because the room has become an island of misfit pieces over the years.

In its way, the guest room is charming, an attic of disparate pieces, all storied and meaningful.   Nonetheless, as a designer, I also know the value of allowing a guest room to be a simplified take on the rest of the home.  This is one of those rooms where you can allow fantasy and beauty to take the lead.  Here you are not beholden to the placement of the television set, nor must you consider how a light rug will withstand the march of daily traffic.

So how do you unpack an over-furnished room, laden with mementos from the past, to make it a soothing oasis for guests, even an afternoon retreat from the rest of the house for yourself?

Start with a checklist of needs only.  For the guest room, it should be as simple as: settle in; sleep; freshen up.

Settle In:

This would have been merely unpacking clothes in the not so distant past, but today it includes making sure your friends know where to plug in their chargers and have your wifi password.   We have guests who need a moment each day to check in on the rest of their world.  And while the etiquette-keepers will remind us that in company we should turn off our phones and shut our laptops,  I feel that whatever my guest wants to do once they retire for the night is purely their concern.

In the vein of more traditional unpacking, however, it is good design to provide a space adequate enough for a guest to open their toiletry bag and loot through it to their heart’s content.  This may be a dresser that is not over-done with accents, or a desk or console table equally uncluttered.

Sleep:

This is not where I opine about bed size or style. The most important thing is to make the bed both cosy and easy to use.  After years of “pillowing up” the guest room, I’ve learned that guests want pillows for two things: head support and snuggling.  No one wants to cuddle up with a pillow they assume is irreplaceable to you, so opt for comfortable, washable goods on the guest bed.  That thread-worn antique bolster is charming, but stressful when a guest is looking around for a place to stuff it during their stay.  And resist the urge to put out too many pillows.  When in doubt, the perfect sum is five: two fluffy ones for sitting up to read, two sleeping pillows, and a small accent pillow for color and snuggling.

A bed without bedside amenities is as senseless as a dining table without chairs.  An important part of enjoying the bed is feeling like you’ve arrived once you’ve gotten under the covers and arranged things just so.  This means provide bedside tables and lighting. Even if your room is a tiny New York apartment, you can hang a wall shelf beside the bed large enough for a book or a glass of water. And a wall-mounted sconce will serve your company perfectly if they need to catch a little Jane Austen before sleep.

Another important component to guest room design is knowing that privacy and light control are hugely important to many people.  If you have windows in the guest room (and we hope you do), make sure you’ve dressed them to moderate noise and light from outside.  There are many shading systems and options for drapery that will not only shut out the glare of a street lamp or the morning sun, but also blanket noise to provide a better oasis.

Freshen Up:

The best practice regarding “welcome” setups is to opt for less is more.  I’ve been placed before baskets so laden with travel-sized lotions, sanitizers, and mouthwashes that I’ve felt more like an impulse buyer at a Rite-Aid checkout line than a guest in a friend’s home.  And that pricy lotion you bought at a boutique may please one guest, but turn off another with its posh lavender scent. Trust that your guest has brought their preferred toiletries with them.  It is sufficient to lay out clean towels and wash cloths and to show guests where they may find emergency toiletries (out of plain sight) should the need arise. There is a fine line between charming a guest with your attention to detail and overwhelming them with just plain stuff.

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Once you start organizing your thoughts around the function of the space, as I’ve outlined above, it’s easy to see that the room really needs simple basics to start: bed, bedside tables, dresser or table top, lamps, and window treatments.

Surely rugs make it cozier, and art adds interest, but lean toward simplicity when adding the decorative elements.  The degree of simplicity is determined by your own style.  If you’re already a minimalist, our list of basics may be asking you to put more in the room than you might otherwise. Conversely, to the collector of many things, the imperative is to use restraint to keep the room from feeling over-saturated with your sensibility. After all, the guest holds you in high esteem, but this space should give them a little neutrality, a time out from one another.  Tone it down just a notch, by curating the collections in this room.

I hope to share before and after pictures in the weeks to come and look forward to practicing what I’m preaching as I renovate the guest room in my home.

Cheers!

PM

Stairway to Heaven

The latest design concept we’re loving is facing stairwell risers with vinyl patterns from Spicher and Company.  These floor covering cut easily with a straight edge and an X-acto knife, so they can conform to just about any curve or twist in the stairs.  The best part is they clean up with lightly sudsy water, so they’re as family-friendly as they are beautiful.

spicher rug mix

Here’s our tip for deciding which pattern and style you like.  Unless you’re a math genius, it may be hard to match the scale exactly with our method, but you can get close enough to help you visualize the outcome.  Simply take a picture of your stairwell in clean crisp lighting (flood with a work lamp if your own light is insufficient) and then use a box cutter and a straight edge to cut the risers out of your printed image. Slide printouts of the patterns that intrigue you under the image so that they appear in the cut away spaces.  We recommend printing the image on card stock to make cutting easier. Below, our own project:

Interior Design, Northern Virginia

Interior Design, Northern Virginia

The vinyl sheeting also makes for unexpected and striking kitchen backsplashes, so you can spread the love to the kitchen, too.  Have fun trying it out yourself!

Happy Nesting!